Physics Demo Videos

I have been filming many physics demo videos to use in my gen-ed physics lecture videos to support the remote learning environment. I have decided to make these videos available for other instructors to use.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. The suggested attribution is provided with each video download.

About Science

Inertia – Newton’s First Law

Linear Motion

Newton’s Second Law

Newton’s Third Law

Action-reaction pairs in motion – two force probes are connected and moved around at different speeds in different directions. The force data is collected on a laptop screen in the background. The data readout shows equal and opposite forces from both force probes at all times. One of the videos shows the scenario where both force probes are moving. The other video shows the scenario where one force probe is fixed and the other is moving. Suggested attribution: “Action-reaction pairs in motion” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Momentum

Impulse and force in bouncing vs. non-bouncing collisions – watch as two otherwise identical balls, one that bounces and one that does not, impact with an object. This demo is presented in two ways. (1) Both balls are released from the same height and launched into a piece of wood. The piece of wood knocks over when the bouncing ball collides, but not when the non-bouncing ball collides. (2) Both balls are released from the same height onto a force plate. The data then shows up on a laptop screen running LoggerPro. The LoggerPro screenshot is also included here. (The first data spike is from the non-bouncing ball and the second and subsequent data spikes are from the bouncing ball.) Suggested attribution: “Bouncing and non-bouncing collisions” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Energy

Rotational Motion

Rotational and tangential velocity – a bicycle wheel is rotated to spin a few revolutions. Two pieces of tape are placed at different distances from the center. The first rotation takes 3.07 seconds. The white tape is at a radius of 26.5 cm from the center. The purple tape is at a radius of 9 cm from the center. Suggested attribution: “Bicycle wheel” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Rotational inertia – watch a hoop (508.5 g) and disk (505.5 g) of equal radius roll down an incline. Suggested attribution: “Hoop and Disk” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Stability – a configurable tower with a rotating top is stable in one configuration and topples over when the top section is rotated 180 degrees. Suggested attribution: “Leaning tower” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Inertia in rotational motion – Dr. Pasquale spins a cup of red-colored water around in circles above her head without any of the water splashing down. Suggested attribution: “Inertia in rotational motion” by Alyssa J. Pasquale, Ph.D., College of DuPage, is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

Gravity

Projectile & Satellite Motion

The Atomic Nature of Matter

Solids

Liquids

Gases

Temperature, Heat & Expansion

Heat Transfer

Phase Change

Thermodynamics

Vibrations & Waves

Sound

Musical Sounds

Electrostatics

Electric Current

Magnetism

Electromagnetic Induction

Properties of Light

Color

Reflection & Refraction

Light Waves

Light Emission

Light Quanta

The Atom & the Quantum

The Atomic Nucleus & Radioactivity

Nuclear Fission & Fusion